Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Fig Jam Pockets


2010 was the year for me! Learning to can was on my bucket list. I always marveled at my Moms canning skills and love for this art form. Canned peaches and apricots were her specialty along with strawberry jam. During the winter, we would enjoy literally the fruits of her labor.

I took the plunge a few months ago. Did my research, purchased books on canning and collected the equipment. After reading a lot of the books, my biggest fear was that the jars would not seal. Quickly I learned that the process was actually quite simple, straightforward and extremely rewarding. After seeing my kitchen counters filled with all those beautiful jars and hearing that popping sound all the way upstairs in my office, I knew that I had achieved the success that I desired.


























My first attempt was dill pickles. At Costco, while in the refrigerated section, where you need a jacket if you are in there for more than a few minutes, I saw packages of miniature cucumbers that were perfect for making dill pickles. They were so inspirational, that I popped two big bags in my shopping cart and five minutes later I picked up two more bags. I thought if I am going to make dill pickles, I am making a large batch. They are just about ready to taste and my husband is dying to check them out. Keep your fingers crossed.

My second canning adventure was fig jam since I am completely obsessed with these little jewels. After enjoying every page of the Thomas Keller Ad Hoc cookbook, his fig jam recipe caught my eye. It was the balsamic vinegar and knowing that when it is cooked, it becomes sweet, intrigued me. Thirty half pints later, my fig jam was complete.
















Recently, I was enthused by a post for Rhubarb Hand Pies from fellow blogger Liren at Kitchen Confidante. Her blog is absolutely beautiful and I recommend taking a look.  In addition, another inspiration came from the jam pockets that I pick up at the Farmers Market at the Ferry Building in San Francisco from a wonderful bakery in Healdsburg. It is called the Downtown Bakery & Creamery. My husband absolutely loves these jam pockets and I love the almond tart they make.

I am always thinking about things to make and put on the blog to share with everyone. The stars aligned and the Fig Jam Pockets came to life. My husband said they were the BEST cookie I had ever made. Coming from my number one fan, that meant the world to me.  Enjoy!

Fig Jam Pockets

Makes 24

Pate Sucree (From Martha Stewart)

2 ½ C. Flour
3 T. Sugar
1 C. Butter (2 sticks), chilled and cut into pieces
2 Egg yolks
¼ C. Ice water

Additional

Fig Jam
1 Egg for brushing top of pastries
Course sugar for sprinkling on top

Use a food processor, combine the flour and sugar. Add the butter pieces and process until the mixture is crumbly. Lightly beat the eggs and add to the mixture and pulse until combined. Then stream the ice water into the processor and continue to process until the dough holds together. Remove and divide the dough into two balls and flatten. Wrap with plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for at least one hour.

To assemble:

Use a large cutting board and generously flour. Lay one of the disks on the floured board. Place plastic wrap on top and begin to roll out to a thin sheet of dough. You will want to rotate the dough after a few rolls with the rolling pin. Use a square cookie cutter that is 2 inches in diameter or I used a ravioli cutter of the same size.

Each jam pocket will take two pastry squares. Lay one square on the cookie sheet lined with parchment paper or a silpat. Place about 1 heaping teaspoon of the fig jam in the middle. Fill a small bowl with water and use your index finger to dampen the top piece of dough and gently lay on top of the jam filled dough. Carefully press the edges all away around without letting the jam come out. To seal use a fork to press all around the pastry and using a pastry brush, give a gentle wash of the egg on top. Sprinkle with the course sugar.

Bake at 375 degrees for 15 minutes. Remove and let cool on a wire rack. Keep in a airtight container.

33 comments:

  1. Oh these are wonderful! Perfect for a any filling actually!

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  2. Lisa, these are bite-sized goodness. I even like the name of these little gems. I also was comtemplating Thomas Keller's jam from his Ad Hoc book, but there's still something about canning/preserving that makes me cowardly. Nicely done! I'm going to try those pockets...perfect for Fall baking. :)

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  3. Lovely shapes and looks delicious. I would love it with a cup of tea.

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  4. This recipe sounds fabulous, and I have been eyeing it too! Isn't Ad Hoc at Home fabulous? Love that you put your own spin on this by putting your jam in the dough pockets, wonderful job. :)

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  5. Hi Lisa! Oh my goodness, I saw your tweet, and zeroed in on FIG and ran over here as quickly as I could. Adorable and perfect in every way! And what a lovely surprise to see you mention my Rhubarb Hand Pies :) Thank you for your sweet words about them. I'm glad to have been part of these beautiful bites!

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  6. Love these! So universal too, you could put any wonderful jam in there! Thanks for sharing these. I hope I get enough figs to make the jam.
    -Gina-

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  7. Lovely pockets and not a single leakage in sight! I know I would make a mess if I were to attempt making these delicious looking pockets.

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  8. I adore fig jam and in sweet little crusty pockets is just perfect!

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  9. These are so cute and the picture is just awesome! Not to mention, these just sound so delicious! I feel like I would bring these into work for afternoon snacks, hehe ;-)

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  10. I am so into making homemade pop tarts at the moment and these could be a tiny, mini version I could add to my list. These are totally adorable.

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  11. Gorgeous. I mean, wonderful flavor profile and beautifully finished.

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  12. These are SO cute! All summer I wanted to make hand pies but the season got away from me. I actually like these mini versions even better.

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  13. These are beautiful! Great job on the fig jam as well. I love home canning!

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  14. My grandmother was great at canning things. Some day when I have a bigger kitchen I hope to do it as well. Can't wait to make these!

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  15. What beautiful looking cookies!! I'm bookmarking the recipe :)

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  16. those pockets look amazing!!! I just saved the recipe. :))))

    Nesrine @thedoctor'skitchen

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  17. That is a genius idea. I love the dough recipe.

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  18. These looks lovely. Figs are so yummy! Congrats on making the Top 9!

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  19. Mmm, my favorite fig jam. And made even better by being stuffed inside flaky, buttery pastry.

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  20. Congratulations on your beautiful fig jam pockets, they are beautiful:)

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  21. These are lovely and must taste amazing :)

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  22. This recipe could not have come at a better time. I have a few pounds of Turkish figs and was struggling to come up with ways to prepare them. I can totally get behind fig jam pockets! Thanks so much for sharing this tasty recipe.

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  23. I love that you've taken on canning with such gusto! I'm kinda freaked out by the process but you've totally inspired me with your confidence. Or, the awesome looking fig jam. Either way :)

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  24. These look amazing! Wish I had some right now! :)

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  25. I love love LOVE your fig jam pockets ("pop tart things"), Lisa! Charles shared one at work and I nearly died... Mmmmmmmmmmmmm! Thanks!!

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  26. I simply loved this recipe, looks yummy. It is so neatly done we well...amazing...what should I do if I do not want to put the egg yolks, why have we put the egg yolks? Also are these measurements the normal baking cup measurements that we use?

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  27. I finally got around to making these with the Jameson Marmalade I brought home from Dublin. So good! http://tinyurl.com/6g274sl

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  28. Wow, this is a very tasty cake. I'd love to taste it. I also want to create your own. Thanks for sharing your recipe. I'll try it.

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  29. I love these biscuits. These biscuits are very suitable to be enjoyed in the morning with hot tea. With drinking hot tea and biscuits, we can release the boredom for a while.

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